Why Beall’s List Died — and What It Left Unresolved About Open Access – The Chronicle of Higher Education

“Universities still have a long way to go to create systems for researchers to share and collaborate with one another, evaluate one another’s work, and get credit for what really matters in research.”

 

Source: Why Beall’s List Died — and What It Left Unresolved About Open Access – The Chronicle of Higher Education

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The ‘So What?’ Question

Continuing my previous post on editing, here are some useful tips for writing stronger papers provided by Theresea MacPhail, a digital editor for a science journal.

I’d like you to pause a moment from your daily diligence — grinding out future articles and book chapters — and think about those of us who work as editors and manuscript reviewers. And I’d like to ask a big favor — one that will benefit us and you. Before you send in that manuscript, take a second look at that draft you’ve polished three or four times and ask yourself the following question: What is my main argument here?

Theresa MacPhail goes on to suggest three signs that you do not have a central argument:

  • You can’t answer the “So what?” question.
  • Your introduction and conclusion don’t mesh.
  • Your colleagues can’t explain your main argument.

The last point is important. Having a colleague explain your main argument can go a long way in exposing your blindspots and strengthening your argument. Another benefit in having a colleague (or family member or friend) read your paper is to assist in ‘polishing up’ the text. A paper that is poorly written has greater risk in being rejected outright.

Source: The ‘So What?’ Question | ChronicleVitae

Should Journals Be Responsible for Reproducibility?

As the incoming editor of College & Undergraduate Libraries, I find myself asking similar questions regarding many of the papers that I edit. The editors of the American Journal of Political Science outlines their concerns in this article in Inside Higher Education. 

Our goal is to establish a standard for the information that must be made available about the research that appears in our journal. By requiring scholars to provide access to their data and conducting our own replications on those data, we confirm the rigor of, and promote public confidence in, the studies we publish. As one of the top journals in the discipline, we hope to create state-of-the-art standards that others in the field will aim to adopt.

The editors discuss their expereinces and offer suggestions for those journals interested in pursuing reproducibility and  transparency.

Source: Should Journals Be Responsible for Reproducibility? | Rethinking Research

ACRL establishes new Digital Scholarship Section

The Association of College and Research Libraries has established a new Digital Scholarship Section, effective September 1, 2017. The petition from the following interest groups was successful: Digital Curation Interest Group, Digital Humanities Interest Group, and the Numeric and Geospatial Data Services in Academic Libraries Interest Group.

Quoting Krista White, co-convenor of the DHIG: “The move from individual Interest Groups to a Section represents the importance, scope, and breadth of digital scholarship to the information and library profession. Through the formation of a Section, individuals from a wide range of interests will be brought together to share their curiosity and expertise in an effort to understand, define, and create the future direction for digital scholarship as it relates to the organization, preservation, curation, analysis, visualization, and communication of digital works.”

Here is the original acceptance letter sent by Mary Ellen K. Davis, Executive Director of ACRL:

Thank you for submitting your request for the establishment of the Digital Scholarship Section (DSS) for Board consideration. I am delighted to inform you that the ACRL Board of Directors via virtual vote during February 17–23, 2017, approved the establishment of the Digital Scholarship Section to begin September 1, 2017 with the name, charge, leadership, and structure listed below. The Board also simultaneously approved to dissolve the Digital Curation Interest Group, Digital Humanities Interest Group, and Numeric and Geospatial Data Services in Academic Libraries Interest Group.  The Board was delighted to receive your proposal and commented on how thoughtful and well developed it was. They were also pleased to have this new section as a new way to address the current interests of ACRL members.

  • Name: Digital Scholarship Section (DSS)
  • Charge: To provide a forum for ACRL members engaged in exploring, adapting, and implementing emerging digital scholarship services. This includes the topics of digital  curation in support of the lifecycle management of research; digital humanities to cultivate a community of practice involved in digital humanities research and development; and connecting researchers with numeric and geospatial data that is compiled by others. This section will sponsor discussions or programs that share the ways in which libraries are working toward these topics using scalable, efficient, and sustainable methods. This section will inform and educate librarians on digital scholarship trends and new technologies and collaborate with other organizations within the library profession and academe on issues concerning digital scholarship.
  • Leadership: The Executive Committee will be chaired initially by the incoming convener of the Digital Curation Interest Group (Brianna Marshall). The chair will select no less than two members of the inaugural Executive Committee from the incoming or current leadership of both the DHIG and the NGDSIG. The Recorder of the DCIG will serve as Secretary on the Executive Committee.
  • Committees: Executive Committee, Research Data Management (RDM) Committee, Data Q, Data Information Literacy Committee, Digital Curation Committee, Digital Collections Committee, Digital Preservation Committee, Digital Humanities Committee, Digital Librarianship Committee, Numeric and Geospatial Data Services Committee (NGDS), Publications and Outreach Committee, Conference Program Planning Committee, Website Coordinating Committee, Nominating Committee, Education Committee 

ACRL Program Officer Megan Griffin will serve as the section’s staff liaison. Megan will work to update the ACRL Directory of Leadership and ACRL materials to reflect the new section. Megan will also help orient Brianna and the other leadership in their roles.  ACRL Vice-President Cheryl Middleton will be assigning a Board liaison to your section and we will let you know when the appointment is made (typically in April or May).

The Board and staff look forward to working with you and hearing of the accomplishments of the newly approved Digital Scholarships Section.

++++++++++++++
Mary Ellen K. Davis

Executive Director
Association of College and Research Libraries

The original submission request: http://connect.ala.org/node/263905